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Cityscape Foodie File
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Brimming with, and surrounded by, artisanal producers of gourmet goodies at the top of their game, Christchurch is a heaven-sent gastronomic smorgasbord for foodies and culinary connoisseurs alike. And with some of the best produce in the world right on our doorstep (seriously – a lot of these producers just need to poke their heads out the door to source ingredients!), it’s a given that the region’s small food producers are killing it on the national (and international) scene. Why opt for bland and mass-produced when high-quality ingredients, traditional methods and plenty of love are fuelling the rise of ‘artisan eating’ both here and the world over? Join Cityscape for the good (hand-pressed virgin olive) oil on the local scene. FROM THE OVEN … There’s nothing better than the smell of freshly-baked bread and sin-sational cakes – add ol’ skool techniques, natural ingredients including, gasp, butter to the mix and make a beeline for the following bodacious baked beauts....
Cityscape Foodie File
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Category Foodie File

Cityscape gets on a knead to know basis with Pip Lodge, master baker at Breads of Europe.How did you become a master baker? Not long after I finished my apprenticeship I started work as a baker at Breads of Europe. After a couple years the opportunity came up for a head baker. I’ve been doing it three years now and I’m still learning.What makes artisan bread special? Artisan breads take a long time to make, they look more rustic, are not uniform and have huge flavour and texture. We use minimal ingredients of the highest quality so you know it’s good.How long does it take? It could take anywhere from two hours onwards depending on what bread we are making. There’s hours of prep, fermenting, resting and proving involved. Some of it is done the night before and finished off the next night.Biggest seller? Ciabatta, it makes the best garlic bread...
Cityscape Gourmet Food
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Category Gourmet Food

The first in our series on Canterbury's artisan tastemakers, Cityscape catches up with Peter Corbitt, head cheese maker at Barry's Bay Cheese where traditional cheese making techniques have been in use since 1895. How long have you been making cheese? Five years, which makes me a relative new-comer. Why do you use locally-sourced milk? We like to promote our cheese being locally-produced from the milk of cows in the area. We find that the local Friesian cows' milk has a lower fat content and suits the type of cheese we produce. What is one thing that people probably don't know about cheese? The earliest cheese has been dated back to about 3000 BC. What's unique about your cheddaring process? We are the only factory that wraps the cheese in cheese cloths while it is in the molds, then waxes the curd blocks before the aging process begins in the chillers. This...